The EEOICPA was passed in 2000. It provides compensation to workers who became ill as a result of their employment manufacturing nuclear weapons in the USA, as well as their spouses, children, and grandchildren. Ames Laboratory EEOICPA coverage is available for qualified former Workers and their families.

Are you eligible for compensation?
If you or a family member worked at this or another DOE facility and became ill, you may be entitled to compensation of up to $400K plus medical benefits. Call EEOICPA Counsel Hugh Stephens at 1-855-548-4494 or fill out our free claim evaluation, We can help even if you’ve already filed, even if your claim was denied!

Here, we have compiled publicly available information and documentation about the facilities covered by the Act to clarify how their activities relate to the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act.

Ames Laboratory

Also Known As: Iowa State University
State: Iowa
Location: Ames
Time Period: 1942-present
Facility Type: Department of Energy

Facility Description: Ames Laboratory is located on the Iowa State University Campus in Ames, Iowa. During the Manhattan Project, researchers at Iowa State perfected a magnesium reduction process, producing pure uranium metal that quickly became the industry standard. Iowa State was one of the first organizations to supply metallic uranium used as fuel for the first self-sustaining chain reaction at the University of Chicago.

In 1947, the AEC formally established the Ames Laboratory and directed it to focus on materials research. Over the years the laboratory broadened its mission to include fundamental research in the physical, chemical, mathematical, engineering, and environmental sciences as well.

Throughout the course of its operations, the potential for beryllium exposure existed at this site, due to beryllium use, residual contamination, and decontamination activities.

CONTRACTOR: Iowa State University (1942-present)

Listing:
Ames Laboratory  is listed as an Department of Energy (DOE) site under the EEOICPA.

Special Exposure Cohort(SEC) Classes:
The SEC classes for Ames Laboratory  include:

  1. Department of Energy (DOE) employees or DOE contractor or subcontractor employees who worked at the Ames Laboratory in one or more of the following facilities/locations: Chemistry Annex 1 (also known as “the old women’s gymnasium” and “Little Ankeny”), Chemistry Annex 2, Chemistry Building (also known as “Gilman Hall”), Research Building, or the Metallurgical Building (also known as “Harley Wilhelm Hall”) from January 1, 1942 through December 31, 1954 for a number of work days aggregating at least 250 work days, or in combination with work days within the parameters (excluding aggregate work day requirements) established for one or more classes of employees in the SEC, and who were monitored or should have been monitored
  2. Sheet metal workers, physical plant maintenance and associated support staff (including all maintenance shop personnel), and supervisory staff who were monitored or should have been monitored for potential internal radiation exposures associated with the maintenance and renovation activities of the thorium production areas in Wilhelm Hall (a.k.a. the Metallurgy Building or “Old” Metallurgy Building) at the Ames Laboratory from January 1, 1955, through December 31, 1970, for a number of work days aggregating at least 250 work days or in combination with work days within the parameters established for one or more other classes of employees in the Special Exposure Cohort
  3. All employees of the Department of Energy, its predecessor agencies, and its contractors and subcontractors who worked in any area of the Department of Energy facility at the Ames Laboratory from January 1, 1955 through December 31, 1960, for a number of work days aggregating at least 250 work days, occurring either solely under this employment, or in combination with work days within the parameters established for one or more other classes of employees in the Special Exposure Cohort.
  4. All Department of Energy (DOE) employees, its predecessor agencies, and its contractors and subcontractors who worked in any area of the Ames Laboratory at Iowa State University during the period from August 13, 1942 through December 31, 1970, for a number of work days aggregating at least 250 work days, occurring either solely under this employment or in combination with work days within the parameters established for one or more classes of employees included in the Special Exposure Cohort

1. January 1, 1942 to December 31, 1954
This SEC includes DOE employees or DOE contractor or subcontractor employees who worked at the
Ames Laboratory in one or more of the following facilities/locations: Chemistry Annex 1 (also known
as the old women’s gymnasium and Little Ankeny), Chemistry Annex 2, Chemistry Building (also
known as Gilman Hall), Research Building, or the Metallurgical Building (now Harley Wilhelm Hall),
from January 1, 1942, through December 31, 1954, for a number of workdays that total at least 250
workdays, or in combination with workdays within the parameters (excluding aggregate workday
requirements) established for one or more classes of employees in the SEC, and who were monitored
or should have been monitored.
NIOSH evaluated the feasibility for completing dose reconstructions for employees at Ames
Laboratory from January 1, 1942, through December 31, 1954. NIOSH found that the monitoring
records, process descriptions, and source term data available are not sufficient to perform complete
dose reconstructions for the SEC (SEC-00038) class of employees (NIOSH 2006). Table 1-1
summarizes the results of the feasibility findings for each exposure source for the period from
January 1, 1942, through December 31, 1954.

2. January 1, 1955 to December 31, 1970
This SEC includes sheet metal workers, physical plant maintenance and associated support staff (includes all maintenance shop personnel of Ames Laboratory), and supervisory staff who were monitored, or should have been monitored for potential internal radiation exposures associated with the maintenance and renovation activities of the thorium production areas in Wilhelm Hall (a.k.a. the Metallurgy Building or “Old” Metallurgy Building) at the Ames Laboratory, for the period from January 1, 1955 through December 31, 1970 and who were employed for a number of work days aggregating at least 250 work days, either solely under this employment or in combination with work days within the parameters (excluding aggregate work day parameters) established for other classes of employees included in the SEC.

NIOSH evaluated the feasibility for completing dose reconstructions for employees at Ames Laboratory from January 1, 1955, through December 31, 1970. NIOSH found that the monitoring records, process descriptions, and source term data availabl are not sufficient to perform complete dose reconstructions for the SEC (SEC-00075) class of employees (NIOSH 2007b).

3. January 1, 1955, to December 31, 1960
This SEC includes all employees of DOE, its predecessor agencies, and its contractors and ubcontractors who worked in any area of DOE facilities on the Ames Laboratory Campus from January 1, 1955, through December 31, 1960, for a number of workdays aggregating at least 250 workdays, occurring either solely under this employment, or in a combination with workdays within the parameters established for one or more other classes of employees in the SEC. NIOSH evaluated the feasibility for completing dose reconstructions for employees at Ames Laboratory from January 1, 1955, through December 31, 1960. NIOSH found that the monitoring records, process descriptions, and source term data available are not sufficient to perform complete dose reconstructions for the SEC (SEC-00166) class of employees (NIOSH 2010b).

Although NIOSH found that it is not possible to completely reconstruct radiation doses for all of the evaluated class, NIOSH intends to use any internal and external monitoring data that may become available for an individual claim (and that can be interpreted using existing NIOSH dose reconstruction processes or procedures). Therefore, partial dose reconstructions for individuals employed at Ames Laboratory during the period from January 1, 1955 through December 31, 1960, but who do not qualify for inclusion in the SEC, may be performed using these data as appropriate.

Compensation:
As of 07/26/2015, the total compensation paid under Parts B and E of the EEOICPA, including medical compensation, for workers suffering from the effects of having worked at Ames Laboratory is $60,368,456.
Click here for a current accounting of compensation paid to former Ames Laboratory Workers under the EEOICPA.

Ames Laboratory Workers:
If you or your parent worked at this or any other DOE or AWE facility and became ill, you may be entitled to compensation of up to $400K plus medical benefits from the US Department of Labor. Call EEOICPA Counsel Hugh Stephens at 1-855-EEOICPA (336-4272) or fill out the form to the right, whether or not you have already filed a claim and even if your claim has been accepted or denied.

We can help with all OWCP (Federal Workers Compensation) claims, impairments, wage loss and health care. 2495 Main Street, Suite 442 Buffalo, NY.

History:
The Ames Laboratory was formally established in 1947 in Ames, Iowa by the United States Atomic Energy Commission (AEC). At that time, the laboratory was called the Ames Project and had already produced more than 1000 tons of high-purity uranium for the Manhattan Project. Peak employment at the Ames Laboratory was reached in the 1960’s and during the 1970’s, when the AEC became the Department of Energy, and research at Ames evolved towards other forms of energy such as solar power and fossil fuel. The Ames Laboratory still exists today and its research and development now encompasses energy resources, high-speed computer design, and environmental clean-up and remediation among other areas of research.

NIOSH site profile:
The Secretary of Health and Human Services has designated three classes of employees at Ames Laboratory for addition to the Special Exposure Cohort (SEC) as authorized under the EEOICPA.

 SITE DESCRIPTION:
The Ames Laboratory site consists of a number of buildings at Iowa State University (ISU) in Ames, Iowa. The precursor to the Ames Laboratory was the Ames Project, which was established in 1942 in a contract between the Metallurgical Laboratory at the University of Chicago and Iowa State College (Spedding 1947). Ames Laboratory was established by the AEC in May 1947 (Karsjen 2003). The Ames Project/Laboratory played a key role in the production of strategic nuclear materials for the Manhattan Project and the AEC. Early in 1942, at the beginning of the Manhattan Project, the most pressing problem was the preparation of large amounts of pure uranium metal (Ames 1960). Faculty members in the Chemistry Department at Iowa State College, with expertise in rare earth metallurgy, were called on to develop a method to purify uranium and reduce its cost of production (Ames 1960). By November 1942, successful methods had been developed and approximately one-third of the uranium used in the Chicago pile was supplied by the Ames Project (Karsjen 2003). The Ames Project was asked to turn its process over to industry and, in the meantime, to produce as much pure uranium as possible (Ames 1960). Between mid-1942 and August 1945, more than 1,000 tons of pure uranium metal was supplied to the Manhattan Project (Ames 1960).

Once the potential need for thorium metal was recognized, the Ames Project began to develop methods for purifying thorium in 1943 (Ames 1960). By late 1944, a large-scale process for thorium metal production was developed; between 1950 and April 1953, when thorium production was turned over to industry, more than 65 tons of pure thorium metal and thorium compounds were produced by the Ames Laboratory (Ames 1960). In addition to the early uranium and thorium metal production operations, personnel at Ames Laboratory handled a number of other radionuclides, and operated an 80-MeV synchrotron, a 5-MW research reactor, and several radiation-generating machines.

Videos:
Further history of the Ames Project (1942-1946) can be seen below:


 
DOCUMENTS:
NIOSH Petition Evaluation Reports:
Petition 38 (Jan 1, 1942 to Dec 31, 1955)
SEC Petition Evaluation Report – Petition SEC-00038 – Report Rev # 0
Report Submittal Date 04-09-06

 
Petition 75 (Jan 1, 1955 to Dec 31, 1970)
SEC Petition Evaluation Report – Petition SEC-00075 – Report Rev # _0
Report Submittal Date 05/09/2007

 
Petition 166 (Jan 1, 1955 to Dec 31, 1960)
SEC Petition Evaluation Report – Petition SEC-00166 – Report Rev #: 0
Report Submittal Date: July 26, 2010

 
Petition 185 (Aug 13, 1942 to Dec 31, 1970)
SEC Petition Evaluation Report – Petition SEC-00185 – Report Rev #: 1
Report Submittal Date: July 13, 2011

 
SEC Petition Evaluation Report – Petition SEC-00185 – Report Rev #: 0
Report Submittal Date: June 7, 2011

 
Technical Basis Documents:
Oak Ridge Associated Universities – ORAU:
Site Profile for Ames Laboratory
Revision: 03
Effective Date: 01/03/2012 – Type of Document: TBD – Supersedes: Revision 02

 
Revision: 02
Effective Date: 01/14/2011 – Type of Document: TBD – Supersedes: Revision 01

 
Revision: 01
Effective Date: 12/18/2009 – Type of Document: TBD – Supersedes: Revision 00 PC-1

 
Revision: 00 PC-1
Effective Date: 08/20/2008 – Type of Document TBD – Supersedes: Revision 00

 
Revision: 00
Effective Date: 06/22/2007 – Type of Document TBD – Supersedes: None

 
SC&A:
SC&A Draft: SC&A’s Review of the NIOSH Document Issued March 3, 2016, Titled, “Discussion of Ames Laboratory TBD Findings on External Dose”

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